Myth about Facebook posts

#1 Facebook myth that you may believe

Julia Claire Campbell Facebook, Social Media, Strategy 5 Comments

Myth about Facebook postsHave you seen this post on Facebook recently?

“Due to Facebook’s new ‘pay to promote posts’ policy, only about 10% of people that ‘like’ a fan page will see the status updates.

In order to see our posts and notifications just click/hover over the ‘Liked’ button (beneath the cover photo, to the right) and activate the ‘show in news feed’ option.

This will allow you to see all of our posts. Please share this message wherever you can on Facebook!”

The Good News: It’s a myth.

The Bad News: The 10% statistic isn’t entirely untrue.

I will tell you why.

1) Facebook determines what gets in front of you. The reality is that Facebook uses an algorithm called “EdgeRank” (which has been studied and analyzed and written to death about) to determine what gets into everyone’s News Feed.

Most people who clicked the Like button on your Page initially are not seeing all of your posts. They never were.

Before Promoted Posts were even an option, only about 12% of your Facebook page fans were even seeing your posts at all.

Maybe they liked your page a few months ago but haven’t interacted with it since. EdgeRank is not going to force your posts into their News Feeds if it does not think it is relevant.

2) The shelf life of a Facebook post is very short. HubSpot conducted a study and found that the overall shelf life of a social media post is only 3 hours.

All your fans are not on Facebook at the exact time you are posting. And they may not be on it 3 hours from the time that you’ve posted.

It’s up to you to analyze your Page Insights to see what times of day and what days are the best for your particular audience and online community. It might be 2 AM on Thursdays; it might be 5 PM on Saturdays. Test, analyze, improve – that gets results.

3) Posts that get the most engagement win. EdgeRank assigns a “quality score” to all posts – updates, text, photos, videos, check-ins, links – and the subsequent interaction with it – comments and likes.

So every time a fan of yours Likes a post or interacts with your page by leaving a comment, EdgeRank gives it an “edge”.

The formula is here:

Facebook-Edgerank-Formula

There are hundreds of blogs and articles with tips on how to get more likes, comments and shares on your page.

One of the best that I have found is John Haydon’s 27 Ways to Increase Engagement on Your Facebook Page and Mari Smith’s 7 Ways to Craft Your Facebook Posts for Maximum Shares.

If you are repeatedly sharing posts that get a lot of interaction and engagement, if you adhere to Facebook best practices and if you are willing to get creative and think outside the box, your page has a real shot to be successful without giving Facebook a single cent.

What are your thoughts on Promoted Posts? Have you used them? Why or why not? Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section. Thanks for reading! 

Do you need a step-by-step guide to creating digital storytelling campaigns?

You are in luck!

Sign up and get a free chapter of my new book, Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits. This book is designed to be a step-by-step how-to guide for small and mid-size nonprofits that want to learn how to set goals, measure results, and carry out amazingly successful digital storytelling campaigns!

When you sign up, you will also receive my free weekly bulletin with tips, tricks, and advice for savvy nonprofits on how to kick butt at online marketing and fundraising.

Powered by ConvertKit

Comments 5

  1. Ari Herzog

    EdgeRank is not explicit to pages but profiles too. If you’re “friends” with a cousin but you never like, comment, or share the cousin’s wall posts, then Facebook assumes you don’t want to see her in your news feed.

    That’s why I maintain a friend list for family members, knowing I can view all of my family’s wall posts at a go and get around the algorithm.

    1. Post
      Author
      Julia Claire Campbell

      Yes, good point! But the personal profile is much easier to handle – I am brutal about hiding people, deleting people, etc.

      1. Ari Herzog

        But there is no “profile insights” to determine best time of day etc for the profile.

  2. Foodler Kids

    This is super helpful and relevant. Hopefully I’ll have time to read and digest the articles you linked to. For now my free time (when kids are sleeping) dictates when I can write and post, but it is a good goal for the future. Thanks, Julia!

    1. Post
      Author
      Julia Claire Campbell

      I absolutely understand! I have one child, and my blogging doesn’t pay, so I can’t do it during my work hours – I have to do it late at night or early in the morning. Good luck!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.